Reel Talk Episode 10 – ‘George Takei Plays A Time Machine’

The title of this week’s Reel Talk reminds me of this video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oO_Ckg5ott8

That can only mean good things.

Today we talk about a bunch of stuff, and honestly, probably bullshit for far too long about commercials, both bad and strangely good. Then it’s on to the reviews! Zhana describes her experience at the Palestinian Film Festival, I talk (and sing) about Frozen and Pete had just a horrible time at the movies with Free Birds and Oldboy.

http://petros0001.podbean.com/2013/12/10/kcl-radio-reel-talk-episode-10-george-takei-plays-a-time-machine/

Towards the end I briefly plug FilmCritHulk’s new scriptwriting book, which can be bought from Amazon (UK link: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Screenwriting-101-Film-Crit-Hulk-ebook/dp/B00H0NQE7S/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top). Fact of the matter is though that I talk too briefly about this giant critic, so please bear with me while I expand on comments made.

Film Critic Hulk is one of the best writers on film the internet currently has. This is in part because of his ability and experience, but is mainly due to his wide-open heart. There seems to be no limit to the things Hulk cares about, and his columns are full of the joy and significance he finds in the silver screen. Being a Hulk, he is also rather smashy, but the empathy instilled by his dwelling amidst stories means that he strives to be careful about what and who he smashes. He is also eager to learn, and to share.

Which is lucky for me, because it led to Screenwriting 101. Here The Hulk teaches all the knowledge he has accumulated from years of writing, in a manner both informal and authoritative. He is blunt. Writing is hard and the means of achieving success vary from story to story. There is also a great deal of misunderstanding about writing within the film industry. What’s more it is a job everyone wants to do, so competition is honey-badger fierce. However, if you’re willing to put in the effort and tears, you can have a Hulk on your side.

In this volume the elements of story that must be considered (purpose, economy, drama, character, conceit) are described, the shortcomings of writing (inserting self into story, using stories as psychologists, three act structure, the monomyth) are advised against, and techniques (therefore/but) are explained. The complexity of it is dizzying, and I came away knowing that I will be revisiting this work time and again as I try to achieve success. It has already become a vital resource. So, I’d like to end this note with a thankyou.

Thankyou, Mr Hulk. Not because you told me how to get my screenplay sold, or gave me the winning writing formula. Rather, Thankyou, because you outlined in detail the deep and stormy sea that is the writer’s life, and then built me a springboard, so I might more elegantly dive in.

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